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ReliefWeb - Updates
    0 0

    Source:  UN General Assembly
    Country:  Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic (the), Chad, China, Colombia, Congo (the), Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia (the), Georgia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Niger (the), Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines (the), Russian Federation (the), Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan (the), Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic (the), Tajikistan, Thailand, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania (the), Uzbekistan, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
    I. Introduction

    1. A significant increase in the numbers of persons of concern to UNHCR brought new challenges in 2006. While there was a 14 per cent increase in refugee numbers from the previous year, the Office's involvement, together with other humanitarian partners, in protecting and assisting internally displaced persons (IDPs) under the inter-agency cluster approach, resulted in a doubling of IDP figures. Thanks to better data capturing, many more stateless people have been identified, also swelling numbers.

    2. Despite a plethora of complex challenges, much progress has been achieved in upholding and strengthening international protection in many areas across the world in recent years, notably through sustained efforts to implement the Agenda for Protection. However, as many States increase their efforts to manage migration, the problems of identifying people with a well-founded fear of persecution within irregular mixed migration movements in order to ensure appropriate protection measures remain of particular concern to the Office today. This will be the main focus of discussions at the first meeting of the High Commissioner's Dialogue on Protection Challenges in December 2007.

    3. Evolving partnership commitments, including moves to participate in the United Nations "Delivering as One" initiatives, as well as the increased responsibilities as lead agency for the protection, emergency shelter and camp management clusters in conflict-generated situations of internal displacement, have added impetus to UNHCR's determination to step up its efficiency, performance and results.

    4. In February 2006, the Office launched an in-depth process of structural and management change designed to improve its flexibility and responsiveness to the needs of beneficiaries. The overall aim is to streamline and simplify organizational processes, reduce administrative costs and enhance the efficiency of field operations, thus providing better services to persons of concern. Alongside this, new financial and management structures and systems are being set in place to support the overall reform process.


    0 0

    Source:  UN Human Rights Council
    Country:  Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Burundi, Central African Republic (the), Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, Lesotho, Liberia, Myanmar, Nepal, occupied Palestinian territory, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan (the), Swaziland, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Uganda
    A/HRC/7/38

    HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL
    Seventh session
    Agenda item 2

    Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and follow-up to the World Conference on Human Rights*

    Summary

    The present report outlines the efforts undertaken by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to implement its mandate. It elaborates on the support given to the continued work of the Human Rights Council and the effective functioning of its mechanisms, both its reform initiatives and its ongoing substantive work. In this context, attention is equally paid to the challenge of the universal periodic review and the support given to that process by OHCHR.

    The report elaborates on the strategic themes identified in the Strategic Management Plan and their implementation. It also provides an overview of the continued efforts to strengthen country engagement and activities for the sixtieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. One focus of the report is the continued commitment to the fight against racism and, in particular, the Durban Review process. Finally, the report highlights the support for human rights instruments and the potential role of the universal periodic review in the promotion of their universal application.

    * The present report was submitted after the deadline so as to reflect the most recent information.


    0 0

    Source:  Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country:  Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Niger (the), Togo, Somalia, Kenya, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan (the), United Republic of Tanzania (the), Uganda, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi, Swaziland, Lesotho, Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Burundi, Sri Lanka, Democratic People's Republic of Korea (the), Timor-Leste, Nepal, Bangladesh, China, Iraq, Haiti, Dominican Republic (the), Nicaragua, Ghana, Benin, Senegal, Mauritania, Bolivia, Ecuador, Guinea-Bissau, South Africa, Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Tajikistan
    HIGHLIGHTS

    - World cereal production in 2008 is forecast to increase 2.6 percent to a record 2 164 million tonnes. The bulk of the increase is expected to be in wheat following significant expansion in plantings in major producing countries. Coarse grains output is tentatively forecast to remain around the bumper level of last year. Rice production is foreseen to increase slightly reflecting production incentives in several Asian countries. However, much will depend on climatic conditions in the coming months.

    - Should the expected growth in 2008 production materialize, the current tight global cereal supply situation could ease in the new 2008/09 season.

    - International cereal prices have risen further in the past two months reflecting steady demand. Prices of rice increased the most following the imposition of new export restrictions by major exporting countries. By the end of March prices of wheat and rice were about twice their levels of a year earlier, while those of maize were more than one-third higher.

    - In 2007/08 the cereal import bill of the LIFDCs as a group is forecast to increase considerably for the second consecutive year. Prices of basic foods have soared in domestic markets across the world leading to social unrest in several countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean. Governments of both cereal importing and exporting countries are taking a series of measures to limit the impact of higher international cereal prices on food consumption.

    - In the LIFDCs, as a group, early prospects point to another only marginal increase in 2008 cereal production. Excluding the largest countries, China and India, the output of the remaining LIFDCs is tentatively forecast to decline slightly.

    - In Southern Africa, where the 2008 main season cereal harvest is about to start, aggregate output is forecast to increase sharply from last year's level. However, another reduced crop is anticipated in Zimbabwe. In North Africa, a strong recovery of winter cereal production is expected after severe drought in 2007.

    - In Asia, prospects for the 2008 wheat crop, already close to harvest, are favourable although outputs are forecast below the record levels of last year. In South America, a record 2008 maize crop is being gathered mainly due to larger plantings. In Central America, a good wheat crop is expected in Mexico.


    0 0

    Source:  Food and Agriculture Organization, World Food Programme
    Country:  Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic (the), Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo (the), Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea (the), Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Dominican Republic (the), Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia (the), Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger (the), Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines (the), Republic of Korea (the), Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Sudan (the), Suriname, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic (the), Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania (the), Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
    Mensajes principales

    El estado de la inseguridad alimentaria en el mundo 2009 es el 10.=BA informe de situación de la FAO sobre el hambre en el mundo desde la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Alimentación (CMA) de 1996. En el informe se destaca el hecho de que, incluso antes de que se produjeran la crisis alimentaria y la crisis económica, el n=FAmero de personas que padecían hambre había aumentado lenta pero constantemente. Sin embargo, el inicio de estas crisis provocó el incremento pronunciado del n=FAmero de personas que padecen hambre en el mundo.

    Como resultado de la crisis económica mundial, los países en desarrollo están sufriendo disminuciones de las remesas, los beneficios de las exportaciones, la inversión extranjera directa y la asistencia extranjera, lo que provoca la pérdida de empleos e ingresos. Esta pérdida de ingresos se complica por los precios de los alimentos, que siguen siendo relativamente elevados en los mercados locales de muchos países pobres.

    Como consecuencia, los hogares pobres se ven obligados a consumir menos comidas y alimentos menos nutritivos, reducir los gastos sanitarios y de educación y vender sus bienes.

    A pesar de las dificultades financieras que afrontan los gobiernos de todo el mundo, la inversión en agricultura y las redes de seguridad siguen constituyendo partes esenciales de la respuesta eficaz que se debe dar para reducir la inseguridad alimentaria ahora y en el futuro.

    El hambre estaba en aumento incluso antes de la crisis alimentaria y la crisis económica. El objetivo de la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Alimentación de reducir a la mitad el n=FAmero de personas subnutridas para que fuera inferior a los 420 millones de personas antes de 2015 no se logrará si contin=FAan las tendencias que prevalecían antes de ambas crisis.

    La FAO estima que en 2009 hay 1 020 millones de personas subnutridas en todo el mundo. Esta es la mayor cifra de personas hambrientas desde 1970 y significa un empeoramiento de las tendencias insatisfactorias presentes ya antes de la crisis económica.

    El incremento de la inseguridad alimentaria no es el resultado de malas cosechas, sino de los elevados precios nacionales de los alimentos, los menores ingresos y un desempleo en aumento, que han reducido el acceso de las personas pobres a los alimentos. En otras palabras, los beneficios derivados de la caída de los precios mundiales de los cereales se han visto más que contrarrestados por el declive económico mundial.

    Para abordar la carga de las crisis consecutivas de los alimentos y la economía, las personas pobres reducen la diversidad de sus dietas y el gasto en necesidades esenciales, como la educación y los cuidados sanitarios. Ya se pusieron a prueba los mecanismos de adaptación durante la crisis alimentaria, y ahora los pobres se verán obligados a recurrir a=FAn más a sus escasos bienes, lo que creará trampas de pobreza y afectará negativamente a la seguridad alimentaria a largo plazo. La mortalidad infantil aumentará y las niñas se verán más afectadas que los niños.

    Un sector agrícola saneado puede amortiguar los problemas económicos y de empleo en épocas de crisis, especialmente en los países más pobres. No obstante, las experiencias adquiridas en crisis económicas anteriores sugieren que la inversión en agricultura podría descender pronto. Se debe evitar dicha reducción para que la agricultura pueda servir de motor del crecimiento y de reducción de la pobreza y constituya un pilar a largo plazo del enfoque de doble componente para luchar contra el hambre. La mayor inversión en agricultura en las décadas de 1970 y 1980 ayudó en gran medida a reducir el n=FAmero de personas subnutridas. Junto con la agricultura, se debe prestar la debida atención al desarrollo del sector no agrícola en el medio rural, que representa otra vía para salir de la pobreza y la inseguridad alimentaria.

    Las intervenciones relacionadas con las redes de seguridad deberían abordar el impacto inmediato en las personas vulnerables y proporcionar al mismo tiempo soluciones sostenibles para los problemas subyacentes. En cuanto pilares de apoyo a corto plazo del enfoque de doble componente, las redes de seguridad deben permitir a los beneficiarios acceder más fácilmente al crédito, así como a insumos modernos, y adoptar nuevas tecnologías, lo que les permitirá dejar de depender del programa de redes de seguridad. Para alcanzar estos objetivos, las redes de seguridad deben estar bien integradas en programas más amplios de asistencia social. Se deberá prestar especial ayuda a las personas pobres del medio urbano, ya que se vieron gravemente afectadas por la crisis alimentaria y es más probable que sufran el desempleo debido a la actual crisis económica.

    El hecho de que el hambre estuviera en aumento incluso antes de la crisis alimentaria y la crisis económica sugiere que las soluciones actuales son insuficientes, y que la adopción de un enfoque basado en el derecho a la alimentación desempeñará una función importante en la erradicación de la inseguridad alimentaria. Para que dejen de padecer hambre, las personas que sufren inseguridad alimentaria necesitan tener control sobre los recursos, acceso a las oportunidades, y que se mejore la gobernanza en los ámbitos internacional, nacional y local.


    0 0

    Source:  World Food Programme
    Country:  Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger (the), Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines (the), Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan (the), Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Uganda, Yemen, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Rwanda, Zambia, Swaziland, United Republic of Tanzania (the), Bolivia, Colombia, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic (the), Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru
    This bulletin provides information on price changes for the most commonly consumed staples and the potential impacts of these changes on the cost of the food basket. Staples contribute 40 - 80% of energy intake for the most vulnerable population groups in developing countries. Therefore, even a small increase in staple food prices has a high impact on overall food consumption, especially when the food basket is composed of very few staples.

    The bulletin covers 60 countries over the period July to September 2009 .

    Highlights:

    - Overall: Prices of the main staple food commodities have stabilized or slightly decreased in most of the countries over the last three months compared to the previous quarter. However, in most of the countries, the cost of the food basket is still higher compared to their long term averages (table 3). In 47% of the countries monitored, the overall cost of the food basket is more than 20% above the 5-year averages. This is most evident in countries such as Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Pakistan, Somalia, Southern Sudan, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    - Asia: Rice and wheat prices have either remained stable or declined during the last quarter, except in Timor Leste where the price of rice and maize has increased significantly. Rice and maize make up 60% of caloric intake for households in Timor Leste. In general, prices remain significantly high in comparison to the long term averages.

    - West Africa: Staple food prices remained stable in most of the countries in this region compared to the previous quarter, except for sorghum and millet in Chad and Northern Nigeria, and rice in Côte where prices have risen significantly. However, prices continue to be high compared to their long term averages, up to 150% in certain cases such as the price of sorghum in Benin.

    - Southern, Eastern and Central Africa: Staple food prices remained stable or decreased in most of the countries during the last quarter. However, in Tanzania and Swaziland, prices are still experiencing significant increases. Maize prices have risen by 17% and 19% respectively; representing 33% and 26% of caloric contribution to households diet. Prices remain very high when compared to their long term averages, especially in Ethiopia, Malawi, Somalia, and Zimbabwe where staple food prices are still more than double.

    - Latin America and Caribbean: Staple food prices remained stable or declined in all countries over the last quarter. In fact, prices seem to be mostly returning back to their normal levels. Only Colombia, Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua and Peru are still experiencing prices above their long term averages.

    - Middle East, Central Asia and Eastern Europe: Staple food prices were either stable or decreasing in most of the countries during the last quarter. Compared to their long term average, prices are significantly high in Palestine and Tajikistan, and can be 27% to 93% higher depending on the commodity.

    - Stand-Alone Countries: Staple food prices remained stable or declined in Northern Sudan, whereas they were very high in Southern Sudan. However, compared to their long term averages, prices continue to be very high in both Northern and Southern Sudan.


    0 0

    Source: UN General Assembly
    Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic (the), Chad, China, Colombia, Congo (the), Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia (the), Georgia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Niger (the), Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines (the), Russian Federation (the), Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan (the), Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic (the), Tajikistan, Thailand, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania (the), Uzbekistan, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
    I. Introduction

    1. A significant increase in the numbers of persons of concern to UNHCR brought new challenges in 2006. While there was a 14 per cent increase in refugee numbers from the previous year, the Office's involvement, together with other humanitarian partners, in protecting and assisting internally displaced persons (IDPs) under the inter-agency cluster approach, resulted in a doubling of IDP figures. Thanks to better data capturing, many more stateless people have been identified, also swelling numbers.

    2. Despite a plethora of complex challenges, much progress has been achieved in upholding and strengthening international protection in many areas across the world in recent years, notably through sustained efforts to implement the Agenda for Protection. However, as many States increase their efforts to manage migration, the problems of identifying people with a well-founded fear of persecution within irregular mixed migration movements in order to ensure appropriate protection measures remain of particular concern to the Office today. This will be the main focus of discussions at the first meeting of the High Commissioner's Dialogue on Protection Challenges in December 2007.

    3. Evolving partnership commitments, including moves to participate in the United Nations "Delivering as One" initiatives, as well as the increased responsibilities as lead agency for the protection, emergency shelter and camp management clusters in conflict-generated situations of internal displacement, have added impetus to UNHCR's determination to step up its efficiency, performance and results.

    4. In February 2006, the Office launched an in-depth process of structural and management change designed to improve its flexibility and responsiveness to the needs of beneficiaries. The overall aim is to streamline and simplify organizational processes, reduce administrative costs and enhance the efficiency of field operations, thus providing better services to persons of concern. Alongside this, new financial and management structures and systems are being set in place to support the overall reform process.


    0 0

    Source: UN Human Rights Council
    Country: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Burundi, Central African Republic (the), Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, Lesotho, Liberia, Myanmar, Nepal, occupied Palestinian territory, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan (the), Swaziland, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Uganda
    A/HRC/7/38

    HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL
    Seventh session
    Agenda item 2

    Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and follow-up to the World Conference on Human Rights*

    Summary

    The present report outlines the efforts undertaken by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to implement its mandate. It elaborates on the support given to the continued work of the Human Rights Council and the effective functioning of its mechanisms, both its reform initiatives and its ongoing substantive work. In this context, attention is equally paid to the challenge of the universal periodic review and the support given to that process by OHCHR.

    The report elaborates on the strategic themes identified in the Strategic Management Plan and their implementation. It also provides an overview of the continued efforts to strengthen country engagement and activities for the sixtieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. One focus of the report is the continued commitment to the fight against racism and, in particular, the Durban Review process. Finally, the report highlights the support for human rights instruments and the potential role of the universal periodic review in the promotion of their universal application.

    * The present report was submitted after the deadline so as to reflect the most recent information.


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea (the), Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Dominican Republic (the), Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger (the), Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan (the), Swaziland, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania (the), Zambia, Zimbabwe
    HIGHLIGHTS

    - World cereal production in 2008 is forecast to increase 2.6 percent to a record 2 164 million tonnes. The bulk of the increase is expected to be in wheat following significant expansion in plantings in major producing countries. Coarse grains output is tentatively forecast to remain around the bumper level of last year. Rice production is foreseen to increase slightly reflecting production incentives in several Asian countries. However, much will depend on climatic conditions in the coming months.

    - Should the expected growth in 2008 production materialize, the current tight global cereal supply situation could ease in the new 2008/09 season.

    - International cereal prices have risen further in the past two months reflecting steady demand. Prices of rice increased the most following the imposition of new export restrictions by major exporting countries. By the end of March prices of wheat and rice were about twice their levels of a year earlier, while those of maize were more than one-third higher.

    - In 2007/08 the cereal import bill of the LIFDCs as a group is forecast to increase considerably for the second consecutive year. Prices of basic foods have soared in domestic markets across the world leading to social unrest in several countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean. Governments of both cereal importing and exporting countries are taking a series of measures to limit the impact of higher international cereal prices on food consumption.

    - In the LIFDCs, as a group, early prospects point to another only marginal increase in 2008 cereal production. Excluding the largest countries, China and India, the output of the remaining LIFDCs is tentatively forecast to decline slightly.

    - In Southern Africa, where the 2008 main season cereal harvest is about to start, aggregate output is forecast to increase sharply from last year's level. However, another reduced crop is anticipated in Zimbabwe. In North Africa, a strong recovery of winter cereal production is expected after severe drought in 2007.

    - In Asia, prospects for the 2008 wheat crop, already close to harvest, are favourable although outputs are forecast below the record levels of last year. In South America, a record 2008 maize crop is being gathered mainly due to larger plantings. In Central America, a good wheat crop is expected in Mexico.


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization
    Country: Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic (the), Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo (the), Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea (the), Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Dominican Republic (the), Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia (the), Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger (the), Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines (the), Republic of Korea (the), Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Sudan (the), Suriname, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic (the), Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania (the), Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
    Mensajes principales

    El estado de la inseguridad alimentaria en el mundo 2009 es el 10.=BA informe de situación de la FAO sobre el hambre en el mundo desde la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Alimentación (CMA) de 1996. En el informe se destaca el hecho de que, incluso antes de que se produjeran la crisis alimentaria y la crisis económica, el n=FAmero de personas que padecían hambre había aumentado lenta pero constantemente. Sin embargo, el inicio de estas crisis provocó el incremento pronunciado del n=FAmero de personas que padecen hambre en el mundo.

    Como resultado de la crisis económica mundial, los países en desarrollo están sufriendo disminuciones de las remesas, los beneficios de las exportaciones, la inversión extranjera directa y la asistencia extranjera, lo que provoca la pérdida de empleos e ingresos. Esta pérdida de ingresos se complica por los precios de los alimentos, que siguen siendo relativamente elevados en los mercados locales de muchos países pobres.

    Como consecuencia, los hogares pobres se ven obligados a consumir menos comidas y alimentos menos nutritivos, reducir los gastos sanitarios y de educación y vender sus bienes.

    A pesar de las dificultades financieras que afrontan los gobiernos de todo el mundo, la inversión en agricultura y las redes de seguridad siguen constituyendo partes esenciales de la respuesta eficaz que se debe dar para reducir la inseguridad alimentaria ahora y en el futuro.

    El hambre estaba en aumento incluso antes de la crisis alimentaria y la crisis económica. El objetivo de la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Alimentación de reducir a la mitad el n=FAmero de personas subnutridas para que fuera inferior a los 420 millones de personas antes de 2015 no se logrará si contin=FAan las tendencias que prevalecían antes de ambas crisis.

    La FAO estima que en 2009 hay 1 020 millones de personas subnutridas en todo el mundo. Esta es la mayor cifra de personas hambrientas desde 1970 y significa un empeoramiento de las tendencias insatisfactorias presentes ya antes de la crisis económica.

    El incremento de la inseguridad alimentaria no es el resultado de malas cosechas, sino de los elevados precios nacionales de los alimentos, los menores ingresos y un desempleo en aumento, que han reducido el acceso de las personas pobres a los alimentos. En otras palabras, los beneficios derivados de la caída de los precios mundiales de los cereales se han visto más que contrarrestados por el declive económico mundial.

    Para abordar la carga de las crisis consecutivas de los alimentos y la economía, las personas pobres reducen la diversidad de sus dietas y el gasto en necesidades esenciales, como la educación y los cuidados sanitarios. Ya se pusieron a prueba los mecanismos de adaptación durante la crisis alimentaria, y ahora los pobres se verán obligados a recurrir a=FAn más a sus escasos bienes, lo que creará trampas de pobreza y afectará negativamente a la seguridad alimentaria a largo plazo. La mortalidad infantil aumentará y las niñas se verán más afectadas que los niños.

    Un sector agrícola saneado puede amortiguar los problemas económicos y de empleo en épocas de crisis, especialmente en los países más pobres. No obstante, las experiencias adquiridas en crisis económicas anteriores sugieren que la inversión en agricultura podría descender pronto. Se debe evitar dicha reducción para que la agricultura pueda servir de motor del crecimiento y de reducción de la pobreza y constituya un pilar a largo plazo del enfoque de doble componente para luchar contra el hambre. La mayor inversión en agricultura en las décadas de 1970 y 1980 ayudó en gran medida a reducir el n=FAmero de personas subnutridas. Junto con la agricultura, se debe prestar la debida atención al desarrollo del sector no agrícola en el medio rural, que representa otra vía para salir de la pobreza y la inseguridad alimentaria.

    Las intervenciones relacionadas con las redes de seguridad deberían abordar el impacto inmediato en las personas vulnerables y proporcionar al mismo tiempo soluciones sostenibles para los problemas subyacentes. En cuanto pilares de apoyo a corto plazo del enfoque de doble componente, las redes de seguridad deben permitir a los beneficiarios acceder más fácilmente al crédito, así como a insumos modernos, y adoptar nuevas tecnologías, lo que les permitirá dejar de depender del programa de redes de seguridad. Para alcanzar estos objetivos, las redes de seguridad deben estar bien integradas en programas más amplios de asistencia social. Se deberá prestar especial ayuda a las personas pobres del medio urbano, ya que se vieron gravemente afectadas por la crisis alimentaria y es más probable que sufran el desempleo debido a la actual crisis económica.

    El hecho de que el hambre estuviera en aumento incluso antes de la crisis alimentaria y la crisis económica sugiere que las soluciones actuales son insuficientes, y que la adopción de un enfoque basado en el derecho a la alimentación desempeñará una función importante en la erradicación de la inseguridad alimentaria. Para que dejen de padecer hambre, las personas que sufren inseguridad alimentaria necesitan tener control sobre los recursos, acceso a las oportunidades, y que se mejore la gobernanza en los ámbitos internacional, nacional y local.


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Colombia, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo (the), Dominican Republic (the), El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger (the), Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines (the), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan (the), Swaziland, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania (the), Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
    This bulletin provides information on price changes for the most commonly consumed staples and the potential impacts of these changes on the cost of the food basket. Staples contribute 40 - 80% of energy intake for the most vulnerable population groups in developing countries. Therefore, even a small increase in staple food prices has a high impact on overall food consumption, especially when the food basket is composed of very few staples.

    The bulletin covers 60 countries over the period July to September 2009 .

    Highlights:

    - Overall: Prices of the main staple food commodities have stabilized or slightly decreased in most of the countries over the last three months compared to the previous quarter. However, in most of the countries, the cost of the food basket is still higher compared to their long term averages (table 3). In 47% of the countries monitored, the overall cost of the food basket is more than 20% above the 5-year averages. This is most evident in countries such as Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Pakistan, Somalia, Southern Sudan, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    - Asia: Rice and wheat prices have either remained stable or declined during the last quarter, except in Timor Leste where the price of rice and maize has increased significantly. Rice and maize make up 60% of caloric intake for households in Timor Leste. In general, prices remain significantly high in comparison to the long term averages.

    - West Africa: Staple food prices remained stable in most of the countries in this region compared to the previous quarter, except for sorghum and millet in Chad and Northern Nigeria, and rice in Côte where prices have risen significantly. However, prices continue to be high compared to their long term averages, up to 150% in certain cases such as the price of sorghum in Benin.

    - Southern, Eastern and Central Africa: Staple food prices remained stable or decreased in most of the countries during the last quarter. However, in Tanzania and Swaziland, prices are still experiencing significant increases. Maize prices have risen by 17% and 19% respectively; representing 33% and 26% of caloric contribution to households diet. Prices remain very high when compared to their long term averages, especially in Ethiopia, Malawi, Somalia, and Zimbabwe where staple food prices are still more than double.

    - Latin America and Caribbean: Staple food prices remained stable or declined in all countries over the last quarter. In fact, prices seem to be mostly returning back to their normal levels. Only Colombia, Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua and Peru are still experiencing prices above their long term averages.

    - Middle East, Central Asia and Eastern Europe: Staple food prices were either stable or decreasing in most of the countries during the last quarter. Compared to their long term average, prices are significantly high in Palestine and Tajikistan, and can be 27% to 93% higher depending on the commodity.

    - Stand-Alone Countries: Staple food prices remained stable or declined in Northern Sudan, whereas they were very high in Southern Sudan. However, compared to their long term averages, prices continue to be very high in both Northern and Southern Sudan.


    0 0

    Source: UN General Assembly
    Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Togo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    I. Introduction

    1. A significant increase in the numbers of persons of concern to UNHCR brought new challenges in 2006. While there was a 14 per cent increase in refugee numbers from the previous year, the Office's involvement, together with other humanitarian partners, in protecting and assisting internally displaced persons (IDPs) under the inter-agency cluster approach, resulted in a doubling of IDP figures. Thanks to better data capturing, many more stateless people have been identified, also swelling numbers.

    2. Despite a plethora of complex challenges, much progress has been achieved in upholding and strengthening international protection in many areas across the world in recent years, notably through sustained efforts to implement the Agenda for Protection. However, as many States increase their efforts to manage migration, the problems of identifying people with a well-founded fear of persecution within irregular mixed migration movements in order to ensure appropriate protection measures remain of particular concern to the Office today. This will be the main focus of discussions at the first meeting of the High Commissioner's Dialogue on Protection Challenges in December 2007.

    3. Evolving partnership commitments, including moves to participate in the United Nations "Delivering as One" initiatives, as well as the increased responsibilities as lead agency for the protection, emergency shelter and camp management clusters in conflict-generated situations of internal displacement, have added impetus to UNHCR's determination to step up its efficiency, performance and results.

    4. In February 2006, the Office launched an in-depth process of structural and management change designed to improve its flexibility and responsiveness to the needs of beneficiaries. The overall aim is to streamline and simplify organizational processes, reduce administrative costs and enhance the efficiency of field operations, thus providing better services to persons of concern. Alongside this, new financial and management structures and systems are being set in place to support the overall reform process.


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    Source: UN Human Rights Council
    Country: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, Lesotho, Liberia, Myanmar, Nepal, occupied Palestinian territory, Rwanda, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Uganda

    A/HRC/7/38

    HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL
    Seventh session
    Agenda item 2

    Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights and follow-up to the World Conference on Human Rights*

    Summary

    The present report outlines the efforts undertaken by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) to implement its mandate. It elaborates on the support given to the continued work of the Human Rights Council and the effective functioning of its mechanisms, both its reform initiatives and its ongoing substantive work. In this context, attention is equally paid to the challenge of the universal periodic review and the support given to that process by OHCHR.

    The report elaborates on the strategic themes identified in the Strategic Management Plan and their implementation. It also provides an overview of the continued efforts to strengthen country engagement and activities for the sixtieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. One focus of the report is the continued commitment to the fight against racism and, in particular, the Durban Review process. Finally, the report highlights the support for human rights instruments and the potential role of the universal periodic review in the promotion of their universal application.

    * The present report was submitted after the deadline so as to reflect the most recent information.


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    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Niger, Togo, Somalia, Kenya, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania, Uganda, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi, Swaziland, Lesotho, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Sri Lanka, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Timor-Leste, Nepal, Bangladesh, China, Iraq, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Ghana, Benin, Senegal, Mauritania, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Ecuador, Guinea-Bissau, South Africa, Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Tajikistan

    HIGHLIGHTS

    - World cereal production in 2008 is forecast to increase 2.6 percent to a record 2 164 million tonnes. The bulk of the increase is expected to be in wheat following significant expansion in plantings in major producing countries. Coarse grains output is tentatively forecast to remain around the bumper level of last year. Rice production is foreseen to increase slightly reflecting production incentives in several Asian countries. However, much will depend on climatic conditions in the coming months.

    - Should the expected growth in 2008 production materialize, the current tight global cereal supply situation could ease in the new 2008/09 season.

    - International cereal prices have risen further in the past two months reflecting steady demand. Prices of rice increased the most following the imposition of new export restrictions by major exporting countries. By the end of March prices of wheat and rice were about twice their levels of a year earlier, while those of maize were more than one-third higher.

    - In 2007/08 the cereal import bill of the LIFDCs as a group is forecast to increase considerably for the second consecutive year. Prices of basic foods have soared in domestic markets across the world leading to social unrest in several countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean. Governments of both cereal importing and exporting countries are taking a series of measures to limit the impact of higher international cereal prices on food consumption.

    - In the LIFDCs, as a group, early prospects point to another only marginal increase in 2008 cereal production. Excluding the largest countries, China and India, the output of the remaining LIFDCs is tentatively forecast to decline slightly.

    - In Southern Africa, where the 2008 main season cereal harvest is about to start, aggregate output is forecast to increase sharply from last year's level. However, another reduced crop is anticipated in Zimbabwe. In North Africa, a strong recovery of winter cereal production is expected after severe drought in 2007.

    - In Asia, prospects for the 2008 wheat crop, already close to harvest, are favourable although outputs are forecast below the record levels of last year. In South America, a record 2008 maize crop is being gathered mainly due to larger plantings. In Central America, a good wheat crop is expected in Mexico.


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    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, World Food Programme
    Country: Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Viet Nam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    Mensajes principales

    El estado de la inseguridad alimentaria en el mundo 2009 es el 10.=BA informe de situación de la FAO sobre el hambre en el mundo desde la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Alimentación (CMA) de 1996. En el informe se destaca el hecho de que, incluso antes de que se produjeran la crisis alimentaria y la crisis económica, el n=FAmero de personas que padecían hambre había aumentado lenta pero constantemente. Sin embargo, el inicio de estas crisis provocó el incremento pronunciado del n=FAmero de personas que padecen hambre en el mundo.

    Como resultado de la crisis económica mundial, los países en desarrollo están sufriendo disminuciones de las remesas, los beneficios de las exportaciones, la inversión extranjera directa y la asistencia extranjera, lo que provoca la pérdida de empleos e ingresos. Esta pérdida de ingresos se complica por los precios de los alimentos, que siguen siendo relativamente elevados en los mercados locales de muchos países pobres.

    Como consecuencia, los hogares pobres se ven obligados a consumir menos comidas y alimentos menos nutritivos, reducir los gastos sanitarios y de educación y vender sus bienes.

    A pesar de las dificultades financieras que afrontan los gobiernos de todo el mundo, la inversión en agricultura y las redes de seguridad siguen constituyendo partes esenciales de la respuesta eficaz que se debe dar para reducir la inseguridad alimentaria ahora y en el futuro.

    El hambre estaba en aumento incluso antes de la crisis alimentaria y la crisis económica. El objetivo de la Cumbre Mundial sobre la Alimentación de reducir a la mitad el n=FAmero de personas subnutridas para que fuera inferior a los 420 millones de personas antes de 2015 no se logrará si contin=FAan las tendencias que prevalecían antes de ambas crisis.

    La FAO estima que en 2009 hay 1 020 millones de personas subnutridas en todo el mundo. Esta es la mayor cifra de personas hambrientas desde 1970 y significa un empeoramiento de las tendencias insatisfactorias presentes ya antes de la crisis económica.

    El incremento de la inseguridad alimentaria no es el resultado de malas cosechas, sino de los elevados precios nacionales de los alimentos, los menores ingresos y un desempleo en aumento, que han reducido el acceso de las personas pobres a los alimentos. En otras palabras, los beneficios derivados de la caída de los precios mundiales de los cereales se han visto más que contrarrestados por el declive económico mundial.

    Para abordar la carga de las crisis consecutivas de los alimentos y la economía, las personas pobres reducen la diversidad de sus dietas y el gasto en necesidades esenciales, como la educación y los cuidados sanitarios. Ya se pusieron a prueba los mecanismos de adaptación durante la crisis alimentaria, y ahora los pobres se verán obligados a recurrir a=FAn más a sus escasos bienes, lo que creará trampas de pobreza y afectará negativamente a la seguridad alimentaria a largo plazo. La mortalidad infantil aumentará y las niñas se verán más afectadas que los niños.

    Un sector agrícola saneado puede amortiguar los problemas económicos y de empleo en épocas de crisis, especialmente en los países más pobres. No obstante, las experiencias adquiridas en crisis económicas anteriores sugieren que la inversión en agricultura podría descender pronto. Se debe evitar dicha reducción para que la agricultura pueda servir de motor del crecimiento y de reducción de la pobreza y constituya un pilar a largo plazo del enfoque de doble componente para luchar contra el hambre. La mayor inversión en agricultura en las décadas de 1970 y 1980 ayudó en gran medida a reducir el n=FAmero de personas subnutridas. Junto con la agricultura, se debe prestar la debida atención al desarrollo del sector no agrícola en el medio rural, que representa otra vía para salir de la pobreza y la inseguridad alimentaria.

    Las intervenciones relacionadas con las redes de seguridad deberían abordar el impacto inmediato en las personas vulnerables y proporcionar al mismo tiempo soluciones sostenibles para los problemas subyacentes. En cuanto pilares de apoyo a corto plazo del enfoque de doble componente, las redes de seguridad deben permitir a los beneficiarios acceder más fácilmente al crédito, así como a insumos modernos, y adoptar nuevas tecnologías, lo que les permitirá dejar de depender del programa de redes de seguridad. Para alcanzar estos objetivos, las redes de seguridad deben estar bien integradas en programas más amplios de asistencia social. Se deberá prestar especial ayuda a las personas pobres del medio urbano, ya que se vieron gravemente afectadas por la crisis alimentaria y es más probable que sufran el desempleo debido a la actual crisis económica.

    El hecho de que el hambre estuviera en aumento incluso antes de la crisis alimentaria y la crisis económica sugiere que las soluciones actuales son insuficientes, y que la adopción de un enfoque basado en el derecho a la alimentación desempeñará una función importante en la erradicación de la inseguridad alimentaria. Para que dejen de padecer hambre, las personas que sufren inseguridad alimentaria necesitan tener control sobre los recursos, acceso a las oportunidades, y que se mejore la gobernanza en los ámbitos internacional, nacional y local.


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Uganda, Yemen, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Rwanda, Zambia, Swaziland, United Republic of Tanzania, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Colombia, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru

    This bulletin provides information on price changes for the most commonly consumed staples and the potential impacts of these changes on the cost of the food basket. Staples contribute 40 - 80% of energy intake for the most vulnerable population groups in developing countries. Therefore, even a small increase in staple food prices has a high impact on overall food consumption, especially when the food basket is composed of very few staples.

    The bulletin covers 60 countries over the period July to September 2009 .

    Highlights:

    - Overall: Prices of the main staple food commodities have stabilized or slightly decreased in most of the countries over the last three months compared to the previous quarter. However, in most of the countries, the cost of the food basket is still higher compared to their long term averages (table 3). In 47% of the countries monitored, the overall cost of the food basket is more than 20% above the 5-year averages. This is most evident in countries such as Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Pakistan, Somalia, Southern Sudan, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    - Asia: Rice and wheat prices have either remained stable or declined during the last quarter, except in Timor Leste where the price of rice and maize has increased significantly. Rice and maize make up 60% of caloric intake for households in Timor Leste. In general, prices remain significantly high in comparison to the long term averages.

    - West Africa: Staple food prices remained stable in most of the countries in this region compared to the previous quarter, except for sorghum and millet in Chad and Northern Nigeria, and rice in Côte where prices have risen significantly. However, prices continue to be high compared to their long term averages, up to 150% in certain cases such as the price of sorghum in Benin.

    - Southern, Eastern and Central Africa: Staple food prices remained stable or decreased in most of the countries during the last quarter. However, in Tanzania and Swaziland, prices are still experiencing significant increases. Maize prices have risen by 17% and 19% respectively; representing 33% and 26% of caloric contribution to households diet. Prices remain very high when compared to their long term averages, especially in Ethiopia, Malawi, Somalia, and Zimbabwe where staple food prices are still more than double.

    - Latin America and Caribbean: Staple food prices remained stable or declined in all countries over the last quarter. In fact, prices seem to be mostly returning back to their normal levels. Only Colombia, Guatemala, Haiti, Nicaragua and Peru are still experiencing prices above their long term averages.

    - Middle East, Central Asia and Eastern Europe: Staple food prices were either stable or decreasing in most of the countries during the last quarter. Compared to their long term average, prices are significantly high in Palestine and Tajikistan, and can be 27% to 93% higher depending on the commodity.

    - Stand-Alone Countries: Staple food prices remained stable or declined in Northern Sudan, whereas they were very high in Southern Sudan. However, compared to their long term averages, prices continue to be very high in both Northern and Southern Sudan.


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    Key messages

    • International prices of wheat and maize were generally firmer in January, supported by weather-related concerns and a weaker US dollar. Export price quotations of rice also strengthened mainly buoyed by renewed Asian demand.

    • In East Africa, in the Sudan, prices of the main staples: sorghum, millet and wheat, rose sharply for the third consecutive month in January and reached record highs, underpinned by the removal of wheat subsidies and the strong depreciation of the Sudanese Pound.

    • In West Africa, prices of coarse grains were at relatively high levels in January, despite the good harvests gathered in late 2017, due to strong demand for stock replenishment and insecurity in some areas.


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    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    KEY MESSAGES

    ↗ International prices of wheat and maize increased further in February, mainly supported by weather-related concerns and currency movements. Export price quotations of rice also continued to strengthen, although the increases were capped by subsiding global demand for Indica supplies.

    ↗ In East Africa, in the Sudan, prices of the main staples: sorghum, millet and wheat, continued to increase in February and reached record highs, underpinned by the removal of the wheat subsidies and the strong depreciation of the Sudanese Pound.

    ↗ In Southern Africa, in Madagascar, prices of rice hit record highs at the start of the year, as a result of tight supplies following a sharp drop in the 2017 output to a substantially below-average level and a weaker currency.

    ↗ In West Africa, prices of coarse grains continued to generally increase in February and reached levels above those a year earlier despite the good harvests gathered in late 2017, due to a strong demand for stock replenishment, coupled with localized production shortfalls and insecurity in some areas.


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    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Afghanistan, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Benin, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mexico, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, World, Zambia

    KEY MESSAGES

    ↗ International prices of wheat and maize rose in March for the third consecutive month and averaged more than 10 percent above their levels in December 2017. Prices were mainly supported by concerns over the impact of prolonged dryness in key-growing areas of the United States of America and Argentina, coupled with strong demand. International rice prices remained relatively stable.

    ↗ In South America, severe dry weather and strong demand underpinned the domestic prices of grains in key exporting country, Argentina, while the price of yellow maize spiked also in Brazil in March.

    ↗ In East Africa, in the Sudan, the strong upward surge in prices of coarse grains faltered in March but they remained at record or near-record highs, reflecting the removal of the wheat subsidies and the strong depreciation of the local currency.

    ↗ In Southern Africa, in Madagascar, prices of locally-produced and imported rice declined in February from the record highs reached in January with the harvesting of the minor season paddy crop and following an appreciation of the Malagasy Ariary.